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Showing posts from October, 2012

A secure home gateway on the Raspberry Pi in four parts. Part four, proxying to your devices

I have some very nifty devices lying around in my home:
A couple of computersA very smart router with the Tomato firmwareA Raspberry Pi model B (the only one you can get right now)A Popcorn Hour A200 Besides that, I have full control over a domain name (waleson.com.).

The amount of cool things you can do with this is enormous. However, until yesterday morning, these devices were working with most of their default settings (BOOOORING). Here's how I made it awesome in one evening.
Part four, proxying to your devices.Part one - Dynamic DNSPart two - nginx on the Raspberry PiPart three - free HTTPS to the rescue Objective: You want to access the devices inside from outside over the internet, securely

So far we used all of the devices above, except for the Popcorn Hour. This device offers, amongst other things, a torrent client over the web. If you go to http://192.168.1.133:8077, or whatever IP your popcorn hour has, you'll get redirected to http://192.168.1.133:8077/transmission/w…

A secure home gateway on the Raspberry Pi in four parts. Part three, free HTTPS to the rescue

I have some very nifty devices lying around in my home:
A couple of computersA very smart router with the Tomato firmwareA Raspberry Pi model B (the only one you can get right now)A Popcorn Hour A200 Besides that, I have full control over a domain name (waleson.com.).

The amount of cool things you can do with this is enormous. However, until yesterday morning, these devices were working with most of their default settings (BOOOORING). Here's how I made it awesome in one evening.

Part three, free HTTPS to the rescuePart one - Dynamic DNSPart two - nginx on the Raspberry Pi
Objective: You want to wear protection before we take this to the next level

Congratulations to you all, you now have a working http server on the RaspberryPi in your home, accessible from a nice url. Sure, it's not fast, and only serves static pages, but that doesn't matter.

I said earlier that opening up your router's web interface over http to the entire internet was a bad idea. Eavesdroppers are abl…

A secure home gateway on the Raspberry Pi in four parts. Part two, setting up nginx on the Raspi

I have some very nifty devices lying around in my home:
A couple of computersA very smart router with the Tomato firmwareA Raspberry Pi model B (the only one you can get right now)A Popcorn Hour A200 Besides that, I have full control over a domain name (waleson.com.).

The amount of cool things you can do with this is enormous. However, until yesterday morning, these devices were working with most of their default settings (BOOOORING). Here's how I made it awesome in one evening.

Part two, nginx on the Raspberry Pi.Part one - Dynamic DNS Objective: You want to access the devices inside from outside over the internet. 

Naturally any other linux machine will do, but I have a Raspi lying around. It is energy efficient and fun to play with. Also, the Raspberry Pi is hot on the web, so it does wonders for your Hacker News article or your SEO leads. So if you don't have a Raspberry Pi, please do the substitution to whatever you have yourself, in your head.

I take it you have set-up Deb…

A secure home gateway on the Raspberry Pi in four parts. Part one, Dynamic DNS

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tldr; How I set up this: DDNS to my home ip. Forward 443 & 80 to nginx on raspberry pi. Register free SSL certificates for own domain. basic_auth and proxy_pass to router and torrent box.

I have some very nifty devices lying around in my home:
A couple of computersA very smart router with the Tomato firmwareA Raspberry Pi model B (the only one you can get right now)A Popcorn Hour A200 Besides that, I have full control over a domain name (waleson.com.).

The amount of cool things you can do with this is enormous. However, until yesterday morning, these devices were working with most of their default settings (BOOOORING). Here's how I made it awesome in one evening.
Part one, dynamic DNS.Objective: You want to access your home router from over the internet using a domain name. 

The first thing you'll need is an IP address. Well, your ISP gives you one. You can either remember this IP, or set up a DNS record to point a domain to it. We'll use DNS because we're humans. R…